Sources for Cantigas

Links to online images of manuscripts of containing the medieval Galego-Portuguese song repertory.

Having already blogged about manuscript resources for French and Occitan song, German song, motets, and Machaut, this page is about online resources for manuscripts of another medieval vernacular song repertory: Cantigas.

E-Mn 10069To. c.1275 (Ferreira 1994). According to Grove, 161 parchment leaves, 32 × 22 cm. No miniatures. 5 text scribes; 1 music scribe (Ferreira, 1994). 128 songs (102 cantigas from f.9v onwards and then 3 appendices with 26 more cantigas (from f.136 onwards). Earliest redaction of the Cantigas de Santa Maria.

E-E MS T.I.1 (T.j.1) E2 or T. Probably 1280–84 (Ferreira 1994). According to Grove, 256 parchment leaves, 49 × 33 cm. 2-column layout. 1264 miniatures, normally grouped in 6 on a full page for a single song or 12 on 2 full pages for the fifth song in each group of 10. Main collection has 194 cantigas and is first volume of a set of 2; the second, incomplete volume, containing 104 songs with empty staves, is now I-Fn B.R.20. F. Not online.

E-E Ms b. I. 2 (j. b. 2)E or E1. Probably c.1284 (Ferreira 1994). According to Grove, 361 parchment leaves, 40 × 28 cm. 2- column layout; 2 music scribes for 416 songs (including 9 repeated cantigas, a repeated melody and 4 cantigas without music). Link to images from the facsimile edited by Anglès. [A massive pdf file — be patient as it loads!]

P-LaCancioneiro da Ajuda / Ajuda songbook. Late 13thC; Grove says c.1300. This manuscript was designed for notation, but the staves were never entered in the spaces left for them. Listing of content with links to transcription and MS images.

P-Lant frag. cx 20 no.2. 13thC. The Sharrer fragment in the Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo. Listing of content with links to transcriptions and MS images. Contains seven songs by Dom Dinis (King of Portugal, 1279–1325) on a fragmentary folio, discovered in 1990 by Sharrer and according to Grove restored in 1993 such that the musical content suffered. 3-column layout; no miniatures. 2 calligraphic styles, possibly by same copyist, with corrections by a different hand. 3 music copyists.

P-Ln Cod.10991Cancioneiro da Biblioteca Nacional / Chansonnier Colocci-Brancuti / Colocci-Brancuti songbook. Listing of content with links to transcriptions and MS images. Copied c.1525 in Rome from a lost 14th-century Portuguese exemplar. Also contains an early treatise on poetry, the Arte de trovar. NB: Black-and-white images only.

I-Rvat Lat.4803Cancioneiro da Vaticana / Vatican songbook. Listing of content with links to transcription and MS images. Copied c.1525 in Rome from a lost 14th-century Portuguese exemplar.

US-NYpm M 979. 14thC (on the Cantigas website) or last quarter of the 13thC (Grove). Vindel MS. MS fragment (bifolio written on one side only) that emerged from a book binding in the early 20thC. Contains 7 songs (all with staves; 6 with notation entered) by Martin Codax, all cantigas de amigo. Listing of content with links to transcription and MS images.

Bibliography

Cantigas website: http://cantigas.fcsh.unl.pt/manuscritos.asp

“Sources, MS, §III: Secular monophony; 6.Galego-Portuguese.” [subscription only]

Ferreira, M.P. ‘The Stemma of the Marian Cantigas: Philological and Musical Evidence’, Cantigueiros, vi (1994), 58–98.

4 thoughts on “Sources for Cantigas

  1. Pingback: Versions and sources of the miracle of Saint Hildefonsus | henrytgdrummond

  2. If you are still wanting to update this list of manuscripts, and the bibliography, you can consult the volume Alison Stones and I edited in 2006: Gautier de Coinci: Miracles, Music, and Manuscripts (Turnhout: Brepols) which has extensive manuscript descriptions as well as essays on all aspects of Gautier’s opus.

  3. Many thanks for this list of the Galician-Portuguese musical sources. It is very helpful.
    I would like to add, however, that there is a little mistake: US-NYpm M 989 is actually US-NYpm M 979.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s